When We Were Birds [2]

Author:

Ayanna Lloyd Banwo

Title:

When We Were Birds [2]

Publisher:

Nataka Books Reviews: 

When We Were Birds [2]

"A love story that's thorny and messy is more like what happens in real life. That the two people get to save each other,  a premise I totally endorse." 

-- Review by @iwanderandread


"The author’s vast knowledge of Trinidad & Tobago is evident in the way she writes about the setting and the characters, reading this book turned out to be a great window into Trinidadian culture and that’s what I really liked about it." 

-- Review by @farida_bookworm


"In the most interesting way, Darwin and Yejide's paths are intertwined, as they each try to come to terms with who they are and what kind of future they are able to live with."

-- Review by @julieambanireads

Nataka Books Full Review: 

When We Were Birds [2]

What I loved about this book;
📚The unapologetic patois. This is a book that stays true to it's setting, and while you might not know what 'limin' means, the meaning is there in the context
📚 A love story that's thorny and messy is more like what happens in real life. That the two people get to save each other- a premise I totally endorse
📚 The plot is a continuous build up and the last 50 pages is the unravelling of it all! These kinds of endings really grip me and keep me hostage. I love to hate it!
📚 That 👏🏾cover 👏🏾


-- Review by @whatiread


The author’s vast knowledge of Trinidad & Tobago is evident in the way she writes about the setting and the characters, reading this book turned out to be a great window into Trinidadian culture and that’s what I really liked about it. Her use of language is beautiful, unique, lyrical but takes some getting used to. I loved the idea of the story, and even though it wasn't the easiest story to understand, something about the story compels you to push through to see what happens. Overall this was a beautiful story.


-- Review by @farida_bookwormcafe



Coming from poverty, Darwin accepts an assigned job as a gravedigger in order to take care of his mother, a steadfast tailor afflicted by arthritis, and thus not making as much money as she used to to get them by. Taking this job goes against Darwin's religion, but what else can you do when caught between a rock and a hard place?

On the other hand, upon her mother's death, Yejide finds herself left to continue her family's legacy: the ability to communicate with the dead.

Do you see where this is going yet? In the most interesting way, Darwin and Yejide's paths are intertwined, as they each try to come to terms with who they are and what kind of future they are able to live with.


-- Review by @julieambanireads