The Fishermen [2]

Author:

Chigozie Obioma

Title:

The Fishermen [2]

Publisher:

Little Brown

Nataka Books Reviews: 

The Fishermen [2]

In a small town in western Nigeria, four young brothers take advantage of their strict father's absence from home to go fishing in a local river. On the journey, they encounter a local wanderer who makes a devastating prediction. This prophecy unleashes a tragic chain of events of almost mythic proportions.


Written with folklore at the forefront of how the story develops, this book delivers with multiple stories and meanings running alongside. A definitive West African tragedy with some of the most evocative sentences since Ousmane Sembene.


--Nataka Book Review



Nataka Books Full Review: 

The Fishermen [2]

The Fishermen makes #My100AfricanBooks which includes the best books we have come across, and books that can be read again for what they offer is not only rich characters and West African tragedicn or dramaric plot but the journey itself is easily travelled with the road being the sentence and the skill of arranging words by Obioma.


In a small town in western Nigeria, four young brothers take advantage of their strict father's absence from home to go fishing in a local river. On the journey, they encounter a local wanderer who makes a devastating prediction to aflict the oldest boy. This prophecy unleashes a tragic chain of events of almost mythic proportions.


Folklore is at the heart of how the story develops. This book delivers with multiple stories and meanings running alongside each other. We have the absebse of the father due to work demands.


A mother looking after the children in the absense and a breakup of the family unit. The freedom the boys have to learn and grow in the village, and the mythical narritive enveloping the whole story. Does casting a spell cause future events on the protagonist? A definitive West African tragedy with some of the most evocative sentences since Ousmane Sembene. For those who like folklore and stories of modern African societies, The Fishermen is an apt protrayal.


--Nataka Book Review