Sankofa

Author:

Chibundo Onuzo

Title:

Sankofa

Publisher:

Little Brown Books

Nataka Books Reviews: 

Sankofa

The really talented writers have a unique way of telling a story in a way that makes readers engaged. From the moment Anna's mother dies and she opens the trunk which had sat unopened for many decades, we know we are in for a good story. The element of surprise leaves readers hanging on, there are reveals but more are planted in the future of the novel.


The central characters are Anna and her father Kofi who looms large in the book as her does in his fictional character. Overall a wonderful book which raises some questions but tells a good story. 


-- Review by Nataka Books

Nataka Books Full Review: 

Sankofa

Our first Chibundo Onuzo book. A likeable voice, short staccato sentences and measured pace to keep the story moving forward. There is plenty to like about 'Sankofa.' 


The really talented writers have a unique way of telling a story in a way that makes readers engaged. From the moment Anna's mother dies and she opens the trunk which had sat unopened for many decades, we know we are in for a good story. The element of surprise leaves readers hanging on, there are reveals but more are planted in the future of the novel.


Anna is about to get divorced, has a distant daughter and as is the case with most people, she goes searcing. Anna's search is for the father she never knew since her mother gave away few details. The unopened trunk appers to be the answer.


The initial impression we had was that the book is written for a particular audience. Or perhaps the experience of the character of Anna reflects that with her perceptions of England and the fictional West African country of Bamana. Is this a play on names? 


The two sisters Elizabeth and Caryl on one side, and Anna's father Francis Kofi Adjei Aggrey on the other, provide a window into the post independence era. We get the 'Kinnakro Five', 'walnut family' and similar names which are loved by journalists and newspapers to create impressions.


The central characters are Anna and her father Kofi who looms large in the book as he does in his fictional character. Overall a wonderful book which raises good questions for discussion and tells a good story. 


Will Anna find what she is searching for in Ghana, sorry Bamana?


-- Review by Nataka Books